Chart SPD-485 Literacy Case Studies Key for Percentiles Low: Student scores lower than

Chart

SPD-485 Literacy Case Studies

Key for Percentiles

Low: Student scores lower than the 21st percentile.

Low to Average: Student scores in the 21st-40th percentile.

Average: Student scores in the 41st-60th percentile.

Average-High: Student scores in the 61st-80th percentile.

High: Student scores in the 81st and above percentile.

Elementary School Student

Student A: Third grade female

· English is the student’s first language.

· Student does not have an IEP but receives Tier 2 RTI support.

· Lexile Level = 420-600.

· On a phonics screener, the student scored in the 20th percentile.

· The student is very shy and does not wish to read aloud.

· She tries hard on assignments but needs a lot of direction to complete them successfully.

· The student struggles with spelling and cannot read multisyllabic words. When reading aloud, she ignores all punctuation marks and sounds robotic.

· The student can use words and phrases to express ideas but she is hard to understand.

· The student struggles to follow verbal directions.

· The student has a hard time getting started on writing, needs to concentrate to form letters: it is not an automatic process. However, once writing the student enjoys the creative process.

· The student has a good friend in class, and they enjoy playing kickball at recess.

· The student enjoys horses and drawing.

Middle School Student

Student B: Sixth grade male

· English is the student’s first language.

· The student has an IEP for dyslexia.

· Lexile level = 450-790.

· On a comprehension assessment using sixth grade text, the student scored in the 15th percentile.

· The student’s reading fluency tested at the second grade level.

· The student works best when he is given structured tasks to complete (e.g., multiple-choice versus open-ended responses).

· The student works best when he is allowed to respond verbally rather than write his answers.

· The student suffers from anxiety.

· The student often has trouble in social situations where figurative language is used, such as, “You’re driving me up the wall!”

· The student often has unusual wrist, body, or paper positions while writing. This appears to make it hard for the student to write and think at the same time. 

· The student does not like to participate in class and often puts his head down when he does not know how to do an assignment. The student requires support from the teacher to get started on tasks.

· The student enjoys working with other students.

· The student easily expresses thoughts and ideas.

· The student enjoys playing video games and plays lacrosse.

High School Student

Student C: 10th grade male

· English is the student’s first language.

· The student has a 504 Plan for ADD.

· Lexile level = 970-1030.

· The student struggles with comprehending what was read and currently performs approximately two grade levels below grade level.

· The student’s fluency lags slightly and is approximately a year below grade level.

· The student has difficulty with reading long passages.

· The student demonstrates difficulty with writing short essays.

· The student tries hard despite attention challenges, and he is motivated to learn.

· The student actively participates in class but speaks out of turn.

· The student is very social and has a lot of friends.

· The student enjoys playing soccer and is in the school choir.

© 2022. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

© 2022. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

image1.jpeg

Share This Post

Email
WhatsApp
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Reddit

Order a Similar Paper and get 15% Discount on your First Order

Related Questions

I need help eview the following videos from the University Library Resources: ·

I need help eview the following videos from the University Library Resources: · “Child Development Theorists: Freud to Erikson to Spock…and Beyond” · “Early Childhood Education” Consider the progression of the major human developmental theories and theorists. Imagine you have been asked by the principal in your school to share